Postcode lottery affects UK broadband users header image

Broadband users in the UK are at the mercy of a postcode lottery, according to a new study. 

Research by broadbandchoices.co.uk found the cost of going online can vary massivley, with some households paying much more than people who live just a short distance away. 

Such is the extent of this variation that even individuals in the same street can suffer from huge disparities. The study revealed residents of Bartons Place in Newmarket, Suffolk are charged twice as much as people in houses only 50 yards away, despite the fact their connection speed is three times slower. 

Herefordshire was found to be the worst county in the UK when it comes to broadband. Households here have a below average number of providers to choose from, the slowest advertised speeds and the second highest minimum costs. 

Rutland, Cumbria, the East Riding of Yorkshire and Devon were also ranked as having a poor level of online access. Meanwhile, the best connections can be found in Greater Manchester, which has the lowest costs and average advertised speeds of 28 Mbps. Hertfordshire, London, Bristol and the West Midlands completed the top five.

Dominic Baliszewski, broadbandchoices telecoms expert, commented: "Broadband has become an essential utility for people in the UK and it's madness that in 2013 people are being penalised simply due to where they live."

He added many Britons are probably unaware of how high the level of variation within their local area really is and called on the government to fulfill its responsibility of providing a consistent level of coverage across the country. 

This is not the first study to a highlight a high level of variation when it comes to broadband speeds, as earlier this month Bdaily reported on a survey carried out by Deloitte that found business connections across the north-west are highly inconsistent.

For a fast and reliable connection that guarantees the same level of service regardless of location, try satellite broadband.

Posted by Mark Wynn